claudialala:

WHAT IS THELEMA? Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law. Thelema (“They-LEE-mah” or “They-LEH-mah”) is a Greek word meaning “will” or “intention”. It is also the name of a new spiritual philosophy which has arisen over the past several hundred years and is now gradually becoming established worldwide. One of the earliest mentions of this philosophy occurs in the classic Gargantua and Pantagruel written by Francois Rabelais in 1532. One episode of this epic adventure tells of the founding of an “Abbey of Thelema” as an institution for the cultivation of human virtues, which Rabelais identified as being squarely opposite the prevailing Christian proprieties of the time. The sole rule of the Abbey of Thelema was: “Do what thou wilt”. This has become one of the basic tenets of Thelemic philosophy today. Although touched upon by various prominent visionary thinkers in the following few hundred years, the seeds of Thelema sown by Rabelais eventually came to fruition in the early part of last century when developed by an Englishman named Aleister Crowley. Crowley was a poet, author, mountaineer, magician, and member of the occult society known as the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. In 1904, while traveling in Egypt with his wife Rose, Crowley became inextricably involved in a series of events which he claimed to inaugurate a new aeon of human evolution. These culminated in April when Crowley entered a state of trance and wrote down the three chapters of 220 verses which came to be called The Book of the Law (also known as Liber AL and Liber Legis). Among other things, this book declared: “The word of the law is Thelema” and “Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law”. Crowley spent the rest of his life developing the philosophy of Thelema as revealed by the Book of the Law. The result was a voluminous output of commentary and works relating to magick, mysticism, yoga, qabalah, and other occult subjects. Virtually all of this writing bears the influence of Thelema as interpreted and understood by Crowley in his capacity as prophet of the New Aeon. One theory holds that each chapter of the Book of the Law is associated with a particular aeon of human spiritual evolution. According to this view, Chapter One characterizes the Aeon of Isis, when the archetype of female divinity was paramount. Chapter Two relates to the Aeon of Osiris, when the archetype of the slain god became prominent, and the world’s patriarchal religions became established. Chapter Three heralds the dawning of a new aeon, the Aeon of Horus, the child of the Isis and Osiris. It is in this new aeon that the philosophy of Thelema will be fully revealed to humanity, and will become established as the primary paradigm for the spiritual evolution of the species. Some of the essential elements of belief in Thelema are: “Every man and every woman is a star.” This is usually taken to mean that each individual is unique and has their own path in a spacious universe wherein they can move freely without collision. “Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.” and “thou hast no right but to do thy will.” Most Thelemites hold that every person possesses a True Will, a single overall motivation for their existence. The Law of Thelema mandates that each person follow their True Will to attain fulfillment in life and freedom from restriction of their nature. Because no two True Wills can be in real conflict (according to “Every man and every woman is a star”), this Law also prohibits one from interfering with the True Will of any other person. The notion of absolute freedom for an individual to follow his or her True Will is a cherished one among Thelemites. This philosophy also recognizes that the main task of an individual setting out on the path of Thelema is to first discover his or her True Will, giving methods of self-exploration such as magick great importance. Furthermore, every True Will is different, and because each person has a unique point-of-view of the universe, no one can determine the True Will for another person. Each person must arrive at the discovery for themselves. “Love is the law, love under will.” This is an important corollary to the above, indicating that the essential nature of the Law of Thelema is that of Love. Each individual unites with his or her True Self in Love, and so empowered, the entire universe of conscious beings unites with every other being in Love. Of course, with the emphasis on freedom and individuality inherent in Thelema, the beliefs of any given Thelemite are likely to differ from those of any other. In the Comment appended to The Book of the Law it is stated that: “All questions of the Law are to be decided only by appeal to my writings, each for himself.” Although Thelema is sometimes referred to as a “religion”, it accommodates the full range of individual beliefs, from atheism to polytheism. The important thing is that each person has the right to fulfill themselves through whatever beliefs and actions are best suited to them (so long as they do not interfere with the will of others), and only they themselves are qualified to determine what these are. Source: http://www.thelema101.com/intro

claudialala:

WHAT IS THELEMA?

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

Thelema (“They-LEE-mah” or “They-LEH-mah”) is a Greek word meaning “will” or “intention”. It is also the name of a new spiritual philosophy which has arisen over the past several hundred years and is now gradually becoming established worldwide. One of the earliest mentions of this philosophy occurs in the classic Gargantua and Pantagruel written by Francois Rabelais in 1532. One episode of this epic adventure tells of the founding of an “Abbey of Thelema” as an institution for the cultivation of human virtues, which Rabelais identified as being squarely opposite the prevailing Christian proprieties of the time. The sole rule of the Abbey of Thelema was: “Do what thou wilt”. This has become one of the basic tenets of Thelemic philosophy today. Although touched upon by various prominent visionary thinkers in the following few hundred years, the seeds of Thelema sown by Rabelais eventually came to fruition in the early part of last century when developed by an Englishman named Aleister Crowley. Crowley was a poet, author, mountaineer, magician, and member of the occult society known as the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. In 1904, while traveling in Egypt with his wife Rose, Crowley became inextricably involved in a series of events which he claimed to inaugurate a new aeon of human evolution. These culminated in April when Crowley entered a state of trance and wrote down the three chapters of 220 verses which came to be called The Book of the Law (also known as Liber AL and Liber Legis). Among other things, this book declared: “The word of the law is Thelema” and “Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law”. Crowley spent the rest of his life developing the philosophy of Thelema as revealed by the Book of the Law. The result was a voluminous output of commentary and works relating to magick, mysticism, yoga, qabalah, and other occult subjects. Virtually all of this writing bears the influence of Thelema as interpreted and understood by Crowley in his capacity as prophet of the New Aeon. One theory holds that each chapter of the Book of the Law is associated with a particular aeon of human spiritual evolution. According to this view, Chapter One characterizes the Aeon of Isis, when the archetype of female divinity was paramount. Chapter Two relates to the Aeon of Osiris, when the archetype of the slain god became prominent, and the world’s patriarchal religions became established. Chapter Three heralds the dawning of a new aeon, the Aeon of Horus, the child of the Isis and Osiris. It is in this new aeon that the philosophy of Thelema will be fully revealed to humanity, and will become established as the primary paradigm for the spiritual evolution of the species. Some of the essential elements of belief in Thelema are:

“Every man and every woman is a star.”

This is usually taken to mean that each individual is unique and has their own path in a spacious universe wherein they can move freely without collision.

“Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.” and “thou hast no right but to do thy will.”

Most Thelemites hold that every person possesses a True Will, a single overall motivation for their existence. The Law of Thelema mandates that each person follow their True Will to attain fulfillment in life and freedom from restriction of their nature. Because no two True Wills can be in real conflict (according to “Every man and every woman is a star”), this Law also prohibits one from interfering with the True Will of any other person. The notion of absolute freedom for an individual to follow his or her True Will is a cherished one among Thelemites. This philosophy also recognizes that the main task of an individual setting out on the path of Thelema is to first discover his or her True Will, giving methods of self-exploration such as magick great importance. Furthermore, every True Will is different, and because each person has a unique point-of-view of the universe, no one can determine the True Will for another person. Each person must arrive at the discovery for themselves.

“Love is the law, love under will.”

This is an important corollary to the above, indicating that the essential nature of the Law of Thelema is that of Love. Each individual unites with his or her True Self in Love, and so empowered, the entire universe of conscious beings unites with every other being in Love.
Of course, with the emphasis on freedom and individuality inherent in Thelema, the beliefs of any given Thelemite are likely to differ from those of any other. In the Comment appended to The Book of the Law it is stated that: “All questions of the Law are to be decided only by appeal to my writings, each for himself.” Although Thelema is sometimes referred to as a “religion”, it accommodates the full range of individual beliefs, from atheism to polytheism. The important thing is that each person has the right to fulfill themselves through whatever beliefs and actions are best suited to them (so long as they do not interfere with the will of others), and only they themselves are qualified to determine what these are.

Source: http://www.thelema101.com/
intro

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witchcraftings:

Woop, here’s the deer vertebrae.

64 notes

(Source: forestwiccawitch, via dragon-well)

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tarotismyreligion:

Oh come on tag your porn people ;P

tarotismyreligion:

Oh come on tag your porn people ;P

(Source: venusinthefifth, via claudialala)

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(Source: claudialala)

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belladonnaswitchblog:

ladybonetiern:

Cottage Crafts: Elemental Magic Storm Ward
[Original craft and instructions authored by bonesofaphoenix]

This is a home protection charm that draws its power from the energy of passing storm systems over your house and gives protection based on the energy of the storm and the damage it is capable of doing.

It’s meant to be a Dormant Ward, which is something that only activates when necessary. As wards can also drain a lot of energy, tying the ward’s powers to the storms that pass around you allows you to keep your energy for other things without having a bit of it constantly tied to a dormant ward, and allows the ward to easily and quickly adjust to circumstances making it a more powerful ward overall.

The point of the ward is to protect your house from minor storm-based damage that may occur- such as hail damage, water damage, damage from debri (like trash cans slamming into the side of your house- don’t laugh it’s actually happened to me and almost broke a window), potential flood or water damage, etc- OR decrease the damage done if damage is inevitable.

Please keep in mind, however, that this does not protect FROM these events in the first place and only helps prevent or protect from the minor damage. If you’re going to get hit by a tornado, the ward won’t stop it. If it floods, your house won’t miraculously be the only one on the block with the perfect yard untouched by the water. That’s unrealistic, and don’t expect this ward to do that.

Materials:

  • Storm Water / Rain water from a storm
  • 4 equal sized sticks or twigs [preferably from a tree or branch blown down by a storm, but not necessary]
  • 3 River rocks or stones
  • Spool of Jute Twine
  • Craft Glue
  • Some Clover or Dill (Optional)

Directions:

  1. Gather all of your materials together and begin by lashing each of the four twigs together in a square shape at the corner using a standard lashing technique.
  2. From the corners, one one piece of twine diagonally across the square and secure it on both ends (this can be done using a regular knot). Trim the edges and repeat with a new piece of twine going diagonally across the other side of the square.
  3. Cut a long length of twine twice as long as the length of your square (round-about). Tie a rock to one end using whatever method you can get to work with the shape of the rock. With the end that does not have the rock attached, tie to the center of one of the horizontal sticks with enough twine left over to run it up through the center of the square (Wrapping it a few times around the crossing portion of the two diagonal pieces of twine) with enough left over to make a loop to hang the ward with.
  4. To make the loop, tie the other end of the twine to the top stick, crate a loop, then use a variation of the standard lashing technique to secure it. (I really have no way to explain this better),
  5. Run a shorter piece of twine from right to left across the center of the square again with the same method, without the rock and loop steps added. When all of these are finished, you should have a combined X and cross shape going through your square.
  6. Tie the other two rocks to their or pieces of twine, then secure them with a basic lash + knot to the two corners of the ward on the same stick you hung the first rock from.
  7. Secure all knots with a NON water-soluble craft glue to make sure they don’t come undone.
  8. Adorn the center with a bit of clover for good luck, and allow the craft glue to dry for at least 8 hours.
  9. Once the craft glue is dry, get your storm water and anoint the Ward with the Storm water while saying “Bound in Bindings, Bindings Bound, I tie this ward to any storm to come around, And if no storm then let it do naught, But if a storm, do as it aught; When in need its protections fly free, and if no harm then dormant it shall be. May its power wax and wane, Just as the storms who do the same.”
  10. Hang it somewhere safe outside on your house (such as a hook on the underside of the porch ceiling if one is available), and you’re done.

Notes: The point of using the storm water, specifically, to enchant the item is to better tie it to the energies associated with storms. These wards are truthfully better done during a storm, or made prior to one and enchanted during one. However, if you’re like me and like to collect storm water then storm water is a pretty good alternative to this.

~What are the pennies in the first picture for?

(via dragon-well)

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Litha Recipes

goddessofpurple:

Buckeyes

  • 1 pound melted margarine
  • 2 1/2 pounds smooth peanut butter
  • 3 pounds powdered sugar
  • 36 ounces semi-sweet chocolate or chocolate chips
  • 1 square of cooking paraffin

To make the insides: Mix the margarine, peanut butter, and powdered sugar together in a large…

8 notes

elegant-autumn:

autumn blog all year round that follows back☾☯✿

elegant-autumn:

autumn blog all year round that follows back☾☯✿

(Source: mystic-revelations)

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elegant-autumn:

autumn blog all year round that follows back☾☯✿

elegant-autumn:

autumn blog all year round that follows back☾☯✿

(Source: enchanting-autumn, via octobersgold)

425 notes